Wearing her typical Mayan dress. Not much different from her everyday dress, but this one has removable, embroidered, white "patches". Dress will not go in the closet as a keepsake, but patches will be removed and dress can be used as any normal garment. Just the skirt alone Mayan women use can cost between $100-$200 DOLLLARS. Since they use the dress every single day, each woman will try to have at least two different dresses. If they're lucky, maybe three. Now that I think of it, I've never seen a Mayan woman wearing a dirty dress, which is a feat, since most I've seen work as street vendors.
I was invited to this wedding by a church brother. It was in a poor town, and very humble people. Yeah, I was  the freak in the room, dressed differently than everybody, about a foot taller than anyone in the room, and with weird facial hair. I must have looked very interesting to "makeup artist cousin" here in the picture, since she glanced the whole time I was there. Sorry, I will not be eaten today young lady.... Wait... Maybe the Aztecs were the cannibals? Not sure... Will wikipedia it later...
These two kids were amazing. Great guitar-playing, no lazy strumming here. Did not get a "Deliverance" vibe at all. Good Christian music.
Bride = 19. Groom = 24. Good luck, you crazy kids...
Notice the bride's "wedding" patches on the skirt. The wedding started at 10:30a.m., ceremonies ended at 12:30p.m., food served shortly thereafter next door. I thought that was the end of it, but came to find out later that weddings start early on the weekend because the celebration goes all the way to Sunday night.
Reception
Reception menu was: Vegetable rice, "russian" salad, unknown meat (I heard it was a pork, beef, chicken concoction), and of course, corn tortillas. Washed it down with warm rice drink. All homemade. Not to be a bad guest, I said a secret little prayer, closed my eyes and gulped it all down. Not bad tasting, but did not ask for second helpings. It's Monday night, so I guess prayer worked :)
Happy as Clams
Landmark restaurant in the middle of nowhere, about two hours away from the capital. The owner, Mr. Paulino, a half-Nicaraguan, half-Swiss smoked sausage expert, decided to settle here and sell sausages at his place, Restaurant Katok. Go figure. The area became knwon for the sausages, and they're now sold everywhere in these parts. The original restaurant was burned down during the GT civil war, after being opened for almost 20 years. Mr. Paulino died shortly thereafter. His sons decided to carry on the legacy and reopened the restaurant now standing. And no, I did not try the sausage. Too stuffed from reception food :(
It was at the deli next door. Lots of sausages, caviar and fine cheeses. This place's location was the equivalent of finding a high-end French restaurant in Manning, SC. It was that out-of-the-way.
Nice seating inside, free wi-fi!?!?, and lots of people in the adjoining room next door. Settled on at least drinking some Irish Coffee. Couldn't pass it up at less than $3 bucks. After that, called it a day and drove back home.
A Wedding...
HoneyBadger
Author: HoneyBadger (ID: 19648)
Posted: 2012-02-28 01:45 GMT+00:00
Mileage: 158.28 km
(1 rating)
Tags: Travel, Adventure, Grand Tour, People
Views: 1464
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Here Comes the Bride!
Wearing her typical Mayan dress. Not much different from her everyday dress, but this one has removable, embroidered, white "patches". Dress will not go in the closet as a keepsake, but patches will be removed and dress can be used as any normal garment. Just the skirt alone Mayan women use can cost between $100-$200 DOLLLARS. Since they use the dress every single day, each woman will try to have at least two different dresses. If they're lucky, maybe three. Now that I think of it, I've never seen a Mayan woman wearing a dirty dress, which is a feat, since most I've seen work as street vendors.
Bride and Groom
I was invited to this wedding by a church brother. It was in a poor town, and very humble people. Yeah, I was the freak in the room, dressed differently than everybody, about a foot taller than anyone in the room, and with weird facial hair. I must have looked very interesting to "makeup artist cousin" here in the picture, since she glanced the whole time I was there. Sorry, I will not be eaten today young lady.... Wait... Maybe the Aztecs were the cannibals? Not sure... Will wikipedia it later...
The Entertainment
These two kids were amazing. Great guitar-playing, no lazy strumming here. Did not get a "Deliverance" vibe at all. Good Christian music.
Looking good
Bride = 19. Groom = 24. Good luck, you crazy kids...
Full Dress View
Notice the bride's "wedding" patches on the skirt. The wedding started at 10:30a.m., ceremonies ended at 12:30p.m., food served shortly thereafter next door. I thought that was the end of it, but came to find out later that weddings start early on the weekend because the celebration goes all the way to Sunday night.
Reception
Wedding Lunch
Reception menu was: Vegetable rice, "russian" salad, unknown meat (I heard it was a pork, beef, chicken concoction), and of course, corn tortillas. Washed it down with warm rice drink. All homemade. Not to be a bad guest, I said a secret little prayer, closed my eyes and gulped it all down. Not bad tasting, but did not ask for second helpings. It's Monday night, so I guess prayer worked :)
Happy as Clams
Kape Paulinos
Landmark restaurant in the middle of nowhere, about two hours away from the capital. The owner, Mr. Paulino, a half-Nicaraguan, half-Swiss smoked sausage expert, decided to settle here and sell sausages at his place, Restaurant Katok. Go figure. The area became knwon for the sausages, and they're now sold everywhere in these parts. The original restaurant was burned down during the GT civil war, after being opened for almost 20 years. Mr. Paulino died shortly thereafter. His sons decided to carry on the legacy and reopened the restaurant now standing. And no, I did not try the sausage. Too stuffed from reception food :(
What is This?
It was at the deli next door. Lots of sausages, caviar and fine cheeses. This place's location was the equivalent of finding a high-end French restaurant in Manning, SC. It was that out-of-the-way.
Inside the Restaurant
Nice seating inside, free wi-fi!?!?, and lots of people in the adjoining room next door. Settled on at least drinking some Irish Coffee. Couldn't pass it up at less than $3 bucks. After that, called it a day and drove back home.
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