Lily Rock from Humber Park.
The trailhead of Devil's Slide Trail, San Jacinto Wilderness.  The trailhead is at Humber Park is in Idyllwild, California.  The San Jacinto Wilderness is located in the San Jacinto Mountain Range in the San Bernardino National Forest.
Suicide Rock.
A Stellar's Jay is checking me out during a water break.  Related to the Blue Jay, these are common in the western mountains of North American.  I affectionately refer to little critters like this as "camp robbers" since they will try to steal bits of food and small shiny objects.
A California Kingsnake on Devil's Slide Trail.  These nonvenomous snakes come in a wide variety of colors but this one is the most unique and vibrant.  I think this type is trying to imitate the highly venomous Coral Snake as a defense mechanism.  Kingsnakes get their name from the fact that they eat other snakes as well as other small critters.
Off the trail and there goes the tail.  Making a speedy getaway after my nearly stepping on it hiking up the trail.  I'm curious how many other snakes I probably walked by without even noticing. I just got lucky here.
Strawberry Valley and beyond.
Lily Rock.
Devil's Slide Trail.
Suicide Rock.
Another of many switchbacks on Devil's Slide Trail.
Suicide Rock with Diamond Valley Lake in the background.
Devil's Slide Trail.
Suicide Rock.
Caramba Trail.
Caramba Trail.
Junction on Caramba Trail near Tahquitz Meadow.
Creek crossing Caramba Trail near Reed's Meadow.
Reed's Meadow.
Creek flowing through Reed's Meadow.
Bushwacking toward the Pacific Crest Trail.  You'll notice that the dense canopy caused my tracker to make a straight line from where I left the meadow to where I picked up the trail again.
Ferns common in this area blanket the forest.
Little Tahquitz Valley.
Little Tahquitz Valley.
Junction on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail near Little Tahquitz Valley.  The Pacific Crest Trail runs from Mexico to Canada along the inland mountains parallel to the Pacific Coastline.
Red Tahquitz.
The three distinct high points above my head are from left to right: South Peak, Antsell Rock and Apache Peak.
South Peak is 7840 ft / 2390 m
Antsell Rock is 7679 ft / 2341 m
Apache Peak is 7567 ft / 2306 m
Red Tahquitz.
Pacific Crest Trail.
Junction of Pacific Crest Trail and South Ridge Trail to Tahquitz Peak.
Lily Rock through the trees.
Pacific Crest Trail.
The ridge down to Lily Rock from Tahquitz Peak.
Saddleback Orange County can be seen faintly at the top of the photo.
Pacific Crest Trail.
Red Tahquitz.
Pacific Crest Trail.
Pacific Crest Trail.
Pacific Crest Trail Marker.
Saddle Junction. No overnight camping allowed.
Rock on Devil's Slide Trail.
Suicide Rock.
Lily Rock and Tahquitz Peak.
Suicide Rock.
Devil's Slide Trail.
Lily Rock through the trees.
From this angle, Lily Rock looks higher than Tahquitz Peak.
Me and Lily.
Here's the sign I completely missed just a few feet from the parking lot.
Devil's Slide, Reed's Meadow, Pacific Crest Trail
Donny Mac
Author: Donny Mac (ID: 16079)
Posted: 2011-07-03 15:06 GMT+00:00
Mileage: 12.72 km
(0 ratings)
Tags: Travel, Photography, Hiking, Landscape, Adventure, California, Riverside County, Lily Rock, Pacific Crest Trail, San Bernardino National Forest, San Jacinto Mountains, Tahquitz Peak, Humber Park, Devil's Slide Trail, Saddle Junction, Caramba Trail, Reed's Meadow, Little Tahquitz Valley, Red Tahquitz, Apache Peak, South Peak, Antsell Rock, Suicide Rock, Diamond Valley Lake, Strawberry Valley, Idyllwild
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Starting at Humber Park in Idyllwild, California, I hiked up Devil's Slide Trail to Saddle Junction in the San Jacinto Wilderness. The San Jacinto Wilderness is in the San Jacinto Mountain Range of the San Bernardino National Forest. You will note that my start and return near Humber Park is different. This is because I completely missed the clearly marked trail and accidently bushwacked through a "soil recovery area" that was also clearly marked. When I finally figured out my mistake, I worked my way to the nicely groomed trail.

From Saddle Junction I hiked down Caramba Trail to Reed's Meadow. From Reed's Meadow I intentionally bushwacked my way up the creek toward the Pacific Crest Trail. It likely would have been faster and certainly easier if I had taken the groomed trails, but I find it invigorating to get off the beaten path and make my own way once in awhile. I rejoined the trail at the southern end of Little Tahquitz Valley and made my way up to the Pacific Crest Trail.

On the Pacific Crest Trail, I hiked back to Saddle Junction and then returned to Humber Park by hiking down Devil's Slide Trail.

IMG_0537
Lily Rock from Humber Park.
IMG_0542
The trailhead of Devil's Slide Trail, San Jacinto Wilderness. The trailhead is at Humber Park is in Idyllwild, California. The San Jacinto Wilderness is located in the San Jacinto Mountain Range in the San Bernardino National Forest.
IMG_0544
Suicide Rock.
IMG_0554
A Stellar's Jay is checking me out during a water break. Related to the Blue Jay, these are common in the western mountains of North American. I affectionately refer to little critters like this as "camp robbers" since they will try to steal bits of food and small shiny objects.
IMG_0558
A California Kingsnake on Devil's Slide Trail. These nonvenomous snakes come in a wide variety of colors but this one is the most unique and vibrant. I think this type is trying to imitate the highly venomous Coral Snake as a defense mechanism. Kingsnakes get their name from the fact that they eat other snakes as well as other small critters.
IMG_0560
Off the trail and there goes the tail. Making a speedy getaway after my nearly stepping on it hiking up the trail. I'm curious how many other snakes I probably walked by without even noticing. I just got lucky here.
IMG_0561
Strawberry Valley and beyond.
IMG_0562
Lily Rock.
IMG_0563
Devil's Slide Trail.
IMG_0564
Suicide Rock.
IMG_0565
Another of many switchbacks on Devil's Slide Trail.
IMG_0568
Suicide Rock with Diamond Valley Lake in the background.
IMG_0571
Devil's Slide Trail.
IMG_0573
Suicide Rock.
IMG_0575
Caramba Trail.
IMG_0576
Caramba Trail.
IMG_0578
Junction on Caramba Trail near Tahquitz Meadow.
IMG_0581
Creek crossing Caramba Trail near Reed's Meadow.
IMG_0583
Reed's Meadow.
IMG_0584
Creek flowing through Reed's Meadow.
IMG_0586
Bushwacking toward the Pacific Crest Trail. You'll notice that the dense canopy caused my tracker to make a straight line from where I left the meadow to where I picked up the trail again.
IMG_0588
Ferns common in this area blanket the forest.
IMG_0590
Little Tahquitz Valley.
IMG_0593
Little Tahquitz Valley.
IMG_0594
Junction on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail near Little Tahquitz Valley. The Pacific Crest Trail runs from Mexico to Canada along the inland mountains parallel to the Pacific Coastline.
IMG_0595
Red Tahquitz.
IMG_0598
The three distinct high points above my head are from left to right: South Peak, Antsell Rock and Apache Peak.
IMG_0601
South Peak is 7840 ft / 2390 m
Antsell Rock is 7679 ft / 2341 m
Apache Peak is 7567 ft / 2306 m
IMG_0603
Red Tahquitz.
IMG_0604
Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0607
Junction of Pacific Crest Trail and South Ridge Trail to Tahquitz Peak.
IMG_0612
Lily Rock through the trees.
IMG_0614
Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0617
The ridge down to Lily Rock from Tahquitz Peak.
IMG_0623
Saddleback Orange County can be seen faintly at the top of the photo.
IMG_0624
Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0631
Red Tahquitz.
IMG_0632
Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0633
Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0638
Pacific Crest Trail Marker.
IMG_0639
Saddle Junction. No overnight camping allowed.
IMG_0641
Rock on Devil's Slide Trail.
IMG_0643
Suicide Rock.
IMG_0652
Lily Rock and Tahquitz Peak.
IMG_0653
Suicide Rock.
IMG_0654
Devil's Slide Trail.
IMG_0655
Lily Rock through the trees.
IMG_0656
From this angle, Lily Rock looks higher than Tahquitz Peak.
IMG_0661
Me and Lily.
IMG_0662
Here's the sign I completely missed just a few feet from the parking lot.
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