Even though it is mid-morning the intersection before the underpass is quite congested, so I chose to go up a flight of stairs to the train platform, walk to this side, descend the stairs, walk under the underpass and remount the stairs to the platform for the inbound train. As this community is at the end of Montreal Island two sets of train tracks, -passenger and freight - and Autoroute Jean Lesage all have bridges to leave the island.
These stairs lead to the small station and inbound platform.
I wondered what all these workers were standing around looking at.
Blue Sky and Vapour Trails
The only other traveller and I were dismayed to hear the announcement that the train should be boarded from the other side of the track - and of course, you can't just walk over there, so it was 'down and up' time again.
As well as puzzling over why the inbound was to come on this track I wondered why this fellow would be needing a life jacket on the train.
Better late than never
It is very nice to have the open green spaces in this area.  Macdonald has the Agricultural Faculty of Montreal's McGill University.
I've never been sure what this is but I assume it has something to do with electricity.
This carriage would be almost packed if it was one of the commuter runs early in the morning.
This youngster enjoyed the view.
I decided to concentrate on looking out my side instead.
This is the Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport  at Dorval, Quebec - the main airport for Montreal.
From this point most of the buildings I saw along the tracks had graffiti on the walls.  Some of it was interesting but most was just messy.
The divided highway leading away into the distance is one of the main north/south arteries.
Waiting in the Sunshine
This is on the other side of the tracks from where that lady was sitting at the Vendome sign.
The Super Hospital is Going to be Huge
I think this milk bottle has been here for over 50 years.
Lucien Lallier station is the downtown 'end-of-the-line'.
The whole outdoor concourse is a tribute the Habs Hockey Team.
Le Club de hockey Canadien is the official name of the team.  I just looked that up because I wanted to be correct - (and I always thought CH stood for Center Hice - vbg )  To the right is the Bell Centre, where all the Habs' home games are played.  The tiles are more than just decorative.  They display with pride 100 famous events in the history of the team and mark the 100th season of the club in 2009.  In the distance some of Montreal's skyscrapers.
One of the 100 Greatest Moments
You can see also that many of the fans were happy to sponsor these commemorative markers.
A Long List of Achievements
Admiring Fans
Guy Lafleur was sometimes referred to as "The Flower" by the sportscasters.
What a super sky to set off that profile.
I love the way things appear when they are reflected.  There is something about the distortions which pique my interest.
One of the main east/west streets of the city, it used to be called Dorchester Boulevard.
Many views of the city take in some period architecture and some sleek modern buildings rising behind it.
In the summer Montrealers enjoy eating meals or taking liquid refreshment outdoors.
I have found that most taggers respect the work of muralists but not so in this case.
Day-glo colours often appeal to me.
Montreal is a dynamic city and at any time there is construction or re-construction going on.  Many hoardings are decorated to conceal their ugliness.
Salutation from the Hoarding
One celebrated feature of Montreal is shown in the background - there is a mountain right in the center of town and it has a cross on top.
These lacy tights caught my eye and the restaurants's hostess shyly posed at my request.
Balcony Alfresco Dining
The shared bicycle system has really caught on in Montreal.  This was the second section of them I had seen since walking from the station.
I have never taken one of the city tours although I have enjoyed them in other cities.  I think I might learn quite a lot by doing so one day.
In the general area surrounding the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) there are many private galleries offering art of all types for viewing and for sale.
The former Erskine and American United Church was purchased by the museum to become its third pavilion and will house the museum's extensive Canadian collection.  Before the reconstruction started, I was lucky enough to visit it to see a representative exhibition and also the marvellous stained glass windows present.
I can't quite tell but I imagine the stained glass windows have been removed and will be displayed eventually in a different format.
This is the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion. It is connected to the  newer building on the south side of the street by an underground passage which also has various museum exhibition rooms.  There are elevators and escalators to get to the various levels.
I went for a quick lunch in the museum's cafeteria and chose a table with a view of the Hornstein Pavilion.
The Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion across the street, designed by Moshe Safdie, was built in 1991. A feature I particularly like is how open it is to the light.
This piece I saw in the museum notes the demise of outdoor movies which used to be so popular.  The image was projected and covered one large wall.
Another in the Same Series
Although there is an elevator I like to use the stairs.
This balcony is part of the former member's lounge area.  The view looks up the street which is on the lower slopes of the mountain.
This is the side of the building whose frontage was shown earlier.
Originally built in 1912, the Beaux Arts building was designed by William Sutherland Maxwell and brother Edward Maxwell.  

BTW, I have been looking up many facts for these commentaries on the Wikipedia website.
Wouldn't you prefer to use these stairs rather than be confined in an elevator?
From the Archaeological Collection
From Egypt
Now displayed on the wall.
These banners advertise some of the exhibits which can be seen currently.
This cow, reclining outside the Hornstein Building, is by Saskatchewan sculptor Joe Fafard.  To read more about Joe Fafard and his famous cows try this site:
http://www.virtualsk.com/current_issue/what_me_worry.html
Have you seen the joke yet?
This was my last view of the museum for the day.
It almost looks as if they are chatting to each other about the pedestrians passing below them on Sherbrooke Street.
More of the Old and New
Area Converted to a Greenspace
More Greenery with Flowers, Too
"Hey, get over yourself and just enjoy life.  It's shorter than you think."  I don't really know why it was written there but this is how I interpreted it.
Mural Beside a Parking Lot
Reflections and Diminutive Mannequins
Protecting the Public Walkway
The Sun Life Building is reflected in the windows of a skyscraper.
The square used to be known as Dominion Square.  One of my first jobs was in the Sun Life Building, in the background on the right.
Statue of Robbie Burns
...you should be ashamed of yourself.  No wonder that seagull looks embarrassed.
Canadian Troops fought at Paardeburg in the Second Anglo-Boer War.
A View of Statue on top of Monument
Yes, that's right, there were only nine of them when this was made, which must have been before 1949.
The Sun Life Lion
When the commission was given by Mgr Ignace Bourget for the building, it was intended to be a scale model of Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome.
Scene in Relief
Just a few of the many which stand above the facade of the Cathedral.
Beautiful Interior Detail of Cathedral
Interior of Main Dome
To the East of the Altar
All the paintwork looked so clean and crisp.
As I took this photo I was thinking of Fossil's cousin Jane, with whom I explored many churches in France.  Jane loves stained glass windows.
The Baldachin over the principal altar.
For historical and other facts about the Cathedral:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary,_Queen_of_the_World_Cathedral
Seen beyond Place du Canada Square.
Relaxing in the Shade
Originally considered part of Dominion Square, it is located on the south side of Rene Levesque Boulevard.
In Place du Canada.
I would have liked to see if there was information about it but I was on my way to get the train home and time was short.
Built by the Canadian Pacific Railway between 1887 and 1889 as its headquarters.
A plaque in front of the church quotes Mark Twain, " This is the first time I have ever been in a city where you couldn't throw a brickbat with out breaking a church window."  While still true that there are many churches in the city there are only this one and the Cathedral left around the square.
Windsor Station is no longer a station for trains but now has a Metro (subway) station below.
The train I was heading for was the first of several scheduled for the evening rush hour.  I was glad to be on time as the later ones would be packed and there might be few seats available.
Bright Interior of the Train Station
Most travellers know exactly which they want but I don't use the trains frequently.  I was pleased to find a young agent who helped me to use the ticket dispenser and then guided me to the correct train.
This photo was taken through the window on the other side of the train so I was pleased that the detail is so sharp.  At this point in the journey the track runs parallel to one of the major roads leaving the city core.
This view of the elevated Ville-Marie Expressway is to the south.
Office and Apartment Towers
Container Yards
I noticed a sign at one of the stations warning travellers to make sure that they were getting onto the correct train.  They all run on the same track to this point and if someone made the wrong choice they could be a long way from home before being able to get the situation righted.
The cold winters take a great toll on the roads and so this is a common sight in the summer on at least a percentage of the highways.  The airport buildings can be seen in the distance.
A few moments after this was taken I could see commuters dashing for their cars in an effort to be among the first to get out of the lot.  I have been on that road on occasion after a train has arrived and, what with the people crossing the street to the remote lot, those trying to get on connecting busses and others merely walking to their homes, the area can be chaotic for a while.
There are many retirement complexes in the Montreal West Island area.  This is one of the latest to be built, conveniently located near Beaurepaire Station.
This alerts me to the fact that my stop is next.  Even more important is the fact that my parents live in this community. ;-)
Almost Home!
As the train pulled away I spied the traffic jammed up at the bridge to Ile Perrot.  It makes me pleased that I rode the train instead of driving my car because that jam can back up traffic for a long way back.
Many of these drivers are waiting to turn onto the bridge ramp.  Some of them are so inconsiderate that they proceed into the intersection without a hope of making it across before the light changes and in the process manage to mess up traffic.  This is often the case even at other times of day so I won't even use this intersection any longer.  Fortunately I have alternatives.
Down to Street Level.
My pedometer tells me how far I have walked on today's jaunt. I had a pleasant day and got lots of exercise too.
To Montreal by Train
Jellylava
Author: Jellylava (ID: 12361)
Posted: 2010-08-17 23:57 GMT+00:00
Mileage: 71.19 km
(3 ratings)
Tags: Travel, Photography, Landscape, landscape, my_town, walking, urban_landscape, culture, sightseeing, historic_building, train_travel
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It had been a while since I visited the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, so I decided to take the train and make a day of it. Some of the images which aren't necessarily attractive show the various landmarks I passed on my way to and from the downtown core of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Once in the city, I allowed myself to gaze around and see the area as a tourist might, so there are quite a large number of pictures.
I would appreciate knowing whether any of you find that I have included too many of the pictures - please don't be shy to tell me by mentioning so in a comment. One more note: in Quebec many placenames should be accented but I have left them out in case the viewer's computer cannot interpret the codes.

The Underpass
Even though it is mid-morning the intersection before the underpass is quite congested, so I chose to go up a flight of stairs to the train platform, walk to this side, descend the stairs, walk under the underpass and remount the stairs to the platform for the inbound train. As this community is at the end of Montreal Island two sets of train tracks, -passenger and freight - and Autoroute Jean Lesage all have bridges to leave the island.
Covered Stairway
These stairs lead to the small station and inbound platform.
That's not working!
I wondered what all these workers were standing around looking at.
Blue Sky and Vapour Trails
Now they tell us!
The only other traveller and I were dismayed to hear the announcement that the train should be boarded from the other side of the track - and of course, you can't just walk over there, so it was 'down and up' time again.
Huh?
As well as puzzling over why the inbound was to come on this track I wondered why this fellow would be needing a life jacket on the train.
Better late than never
Macdonald College Farm Fields
It is very nice to have the open green spaces in this area. Macdonald has the Agricultural Faculty of Montreal's McGill University.
The Baie d'Urfe Industrial Park
I've never been sure what this is but I assume it has something to do with electricity.
Not Many Passengers
This carriage would be almost packed if it was one of the commuter runs early in the morning.
Watching the Passing Scenery
This youngster enjoyed the view.
Dirty Window obscures View
I decided to concentrate on looking out my side instead.
Control Tower and Terminals
This is the Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport at Dorval, Quebec - the main airport for Montreal.
Taggers Strike Again
From this point most of the buildings I saw along the tracks had graffiti on the walls. Some of it was interesting but most was just messy.
Unofficially Known as the Decarie Trench
The divided highway leading away into the distance is one of the main north/south arteries.
Waiting in the Sunshine
Site of the new Super Hospital
This is on the other side of the tracks from where that lady was sitting at the Vendome sign.
The Super Hospital is Going to be Huge
Giant Milk Bottle
I think this milk bottle has been here for over 50 years.
We Have Arrived
Lucien Lallier station is the downtown 'end-of-the-line'.
Decorative Brickwork on the Plaza
The whole outdoor concourse is a tribute the Habs Hockey Team.
Celebrating the 'Habs'
Le Club de hockey Canadien is the official name of the team. I just looked that up because I wanted to be correct - (and I always thought CH stood for Center Hice - vbg ) To the right is the Bell Centre, where all the Habs' home games are played. The tiles are more than just decorative. They display with pride 100 famous events in the history of the team and mark the 100th season of the club in 2009. In the distance some of Montreal's skyscrapers.
One of the 100 Greatest Moments
And another
You can see also that many of the fans were happy to sponsor these commemorative markers.
A Long List of Achievements
Admiring Fans
The Statue of Guy Lafleur
Guy Lafleur was sometimes referred to as "The Flower" by the sportscasters.
Statue of Jean Beliveau
What a super sky to set off that profile.
Distorted Reflections
I love the way things appear when they are reflected. There is something about the distortions which pique my interest.
Boulevard Rene Levesque
One of the main east/west streets of the city, it used to be called Dorchester Boulevard.
The Old and the New
Many views of the city take in some period architecture and some sleek modern buildings rising behind it.
Al Fresco Relaxation
In the summer Montrealers enjoy eating meals or taking liquid refreshment outdoors.
Mural with Unwanted Extra Touches
I have found that most taggers respect the work of muralists but not so in this case.
Mannequins a la Mode
Day-glo colours often appeal to me.
Ephemeral Art
Montreal is a dynamic city and at any time there is construction or re-construction going on. Many hoardings are decorated to conceal their ugliness.
Salutation from the Hoarding
Celebrating Joie-de-Vivre
One celebrated feature of Montreal is shown in the background - there is a mountain right in the center of town and it has a cross on top.
Lace Clad Legs
These lacy tights caught my eye and the restaurants's hostess shyly posed at my request.
Balcony Alfresco Dining
Bixi Bikes all in a Row
The shared bicycle system has really caught on in Montreal. This was the second section of them I had seen since walking from the station.
Open Double Decker Tour Bus
I have never taken one of the city tours although I have enjoyed them in other cities. I think I might learn quite a lot by doing so one day.
Art on Display
In the general area surrounding the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) there are many private galleries offering art of all types for viewing and for sale.
Future Pavilion for MMFA's Canadian Collection
The former Erskine and American United Church was purchased by the museum to become its third pavilion and will house the museum's extensive Canadian collection. Before the reconstruction started, I was lucky enough to visit it to see a representative exhibition and also the marvellous stained glass windows present.
All Being Made Safe and Ready
I can't quite tell but I imagine the stained glass windows have been removed and will be displayed eventually in a different format.
MMFA on the North Side of Sherbrooke Street
This is the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion. It is connected to the newer building on the south side of the street by an underground passage which also has various museum exhibition rooms. There are elevators and escalators to get to the various levels.
Wall Detail seen from Desmarais Pavilion
I went for a quick lunch in the museum's cafeteria and chose a table with a view of the Hornstein Pavilion.
Atrium of the Desmarais Pavilion
The Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion across the street, designed by Moshe Safdie, was built in 1991. A feature I particularly like is how open it is to the light.
Social Commentary
This piece I saw in the museum notes the demise of outdoor movies which used to be so popular. The image was projected and covered one large wall.
Another in the Same Series
Wide Staircase in the Hornstein Pavilion
Although there is an elevator I like to use the stairs.
Rue de la Musee
This balcony is part of the former member's lounge area. The view looks up the street which is on the lower slopes of the mountain.
View of the Church under Reconstruction
This is the side of the building whose frontage was shown earlier.
Classical Interior Details
Originally built in 1912, the Beaux Arts building was designed by William Sutherland Maxwell and brother Edward Maxwell.

BTW, I have been looking up many facts for these commentaries on the Wikipedia website.
Graceful Styling
Wouldn't you prefer to use these stairs rather than be confined in an elevator?
From the Archaeological Collection
From Egypt
Restored Mosaic Floor
Now displayed on the wall.
Colourful Banners
These banners advertise some of the exhibits which can be seen currently.
Bovine Beauty
This cow, reclining outside the Hornstein Building, is by Saskatchewan sculptor Joe Fafard. To read more about Joe Fafard and his famous cows try this site:
http://www.virtualsk.com/current_issue/what_me_worry.html
Hoarding Humour
Have you seen the joke yet?
Hearts in front of the Desmarais Pavilion
This was my last view of the museum for the day.
Gargoyles at Le Chateau
It almost looks as if they are chatting to each other about the pedestrians passing below them on Sherbrooke Street.
More of the Old and New
Area Converted to a Greenspace
More Greenery with Flowers, Too
An Exhortation to Relax?
"Hey, get over yourself and just enjoy life. It's shorter than you think." I don't really know why it was written there but this is how I interpreted it.
Mural Beside a Parking Lot
Reflections and Diminutive Mannequins
Protecting the Public Walkway
Sun Life Building
The Sun Life Building is reflected in the windows of a skyscraper.
Statue in Dorchester Square
The square used to be known as Dominion Square. One of my first jobs was in the Sun Life Building, in the background on the right.
Statue of Robbie Burns
Wee Sleekit, Cowrin, Tim'rous Beastie...
...you should be ashamed of yourself. No wonder that seagull looks embarrassed.
Commemorating the Battle of Paardeburg
Canadian Troops fought at Paardeburg in the Second Anglo-Boer War.
A View of Statue on top of Monument
Emblems of Canada's Provinces
Yes, that's right, there were only nine of them when this was made, which must have been before 1949.
The Sun Life Lion
Domes of Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral
When the commission was given by Mgr Ignace Bourget for the building, it was intended to be a scale model of Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome.
Scene in Relief
Statues of Saints
Just a few of the many which stand above the facade of the Cathedral.
Beautiful Interior Detail of Cathedral
Interior of Main Dome
To the East of the Altar
Delicate Details
All the paintwork looked so clean and crisp.
Curved Stained Glass
As I took this photo I was thinking of Fossil's cousin Jane, with whom I explored many churches in France. Jane loves stained glass windows.
Magnificent and Awe Inspiring
The Baldachin over the principal altar.
Mortuary Chapel
For historical and other facts about the Cathedral:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary,_Queen_of_the_World_Cathedral
Tower of St. George's Anglican Church
Seen beyond Place du Canada Square.
Relaxing in the Shade
South end of Place du Canada Square
Originally considered part of Dominion Square, it is located on the south side of Rene Levesque Boulevard.
Restored and on Display
In Place du Canada.
Interesting Shape
I would have liked to see if there was information about it but I was on my way to get the train home and time was short.
Windsor Station
Built by the Canadian Pacific Railway between 1887 and 1889 as its headquarters.
St. George's Anglican Church
A plaque in front of the church quotes Mark Twain, " This is the first time I have ever been in a city where you couldn't throw a brickbat with out breaking a church window." While still true that there are many churches in the city there are only this one and the Cathedral left around the square.
Gone but Not Forgotten
Windsor Station is no longer a station for trains but now has a Metro (subway) station below.
Commuters Heading for the Trains
The train I was heading for was the first of several scheduled for the evening rush hour. I was glad to be on time as the later ones would be packed and there might be few seats available.
Bright Interior of the Train Station
Which one should I take?
Most travellers know exactly which they want but I don't use the trains frequently. I was pleased to find a young agent who helped me to use the ticket dispenser and then guided me to the correct train.
Another of the Many Churches in Montreal
This photo was taken through the window on the other side of the train so I was pleased that the detail is so sharp. At this point in the journey the track runs parallel to one of the major roads leaving the city core.
Elevated Highway
This view of the elevated Ville-Marie Expressway is to the south.
Office and Apartment Towers
Container Yards
Track for the Blainville Train
I noticed a sign at one of the stations warning travellers to make sure that they were getting onto the correct train. They all run on the same track to this point and if someone made the wrong choice they could be a long way from home before being able to get the situation righted.
Summertime is Road Repair Time
The cold winters take a great toll on the roads and so this is a common sight in the summer on at least a percentage of the highways. The airport buildings can be seen in the distance.
Commuter Parking Lot at Beaconsfield Station.
A few moments after this was taken I could see commuters dashing for their cars in an effort to be among the first to get out of the lot. I have been on that road on occasion after a train has arrived and, what with the people crossing the street to the remote lot, those trying to get on connecting busses and others merely walking to their homes, the area can be chaotic for a while.
Retirement Residence
There are many retirement complexes in the Montreal West Island area. This is one of the latest to be built, conveniently located near Beaurepaire Station.
A Welcome Sign
This alerts me to the fact that my stop is next. Even more important is the fact that my parents live in this community. ;-)
Almost Home!
BottleneckedTraffic
As the train pulled away I spied the traffic jammed up at the bridge to Ile Perrot. It makes me pleased that I rode the train instead of driving my car because that jam can back up traffic for a long way back.
Gridlock Spoken Here
Many of these drivers are waiting to turn onto the bridge ramp. Some of them are so inconsiderate that they proceed into the intersection without a hope of making it across before the light changes and in the process manage to mess up traffic. This is often the case even at other times of day so I won't even use this intersection any longer. Fortunately I have alternatives.
Down to Street Level.
My Constant Companion
My pedometer tells me how far I have walked on today's jaunt. I had a pleasant day and got lots of exercise too.
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