This is sort of a tourist trap because of its location, right across the Main Square. While most items are less than $5 a piece, here is where you can find that beautiful, huge painting for $800-$900 bucks. Which is gringo price. Here, EVERYTHING is on sale, and rarely is the sticker price the actual price. And if you're a tourist, you'll get the sky high price, which is not the real price but a "I'd like to go on vacation for the weekend, here's what you need to pay so I can make it happen." Don't be afraid to bargain everywhere, except restaurants. Doesn't work there, trust me. Although draw, the line at the little Mayan girl asking 1Q ($0.15) for a piece of candy on the street. Don't be a Scrooge and ask for your change back on a 5Q bill.
Lots of stuff at cheap prices... If you know how to bargain. I'm used to asking "Y el precio de oferta?" (What's the sale price), right after they tell me the initial price, since they'll come down right away. Then you can start bargaining from there. And you can really practice here, since you can walk away and just start bargaining for the same item, at the stall next door.
San Jose El Viejo Ruins
Colonial Strip Mall
The rule, when travelling overseas, is "Eat local, save a bundle." Lots of fresh veggies, fruits, and other items at ridiculously cheap prices.
Almost any fruit/vegetable, if in season, can be found here.
There are three varieties of red beans alone, as well as assorted types of corn. Cheap prices, about $1 a pound for beans.
Hadn't seen tamarind in a long time. Popular in the islands.
Trucks come in, unload at the back, where it moves a few feet to the stalls. Market is only open three days a week and it's VERY clean. There isn't a rotten food smell to be found anywhere. Police patrol constantly and it's not uncommon to see tourists walking around with big, expensive cameras, snapping away. I don't let my guard down, but it's very safe,
Fresh Cilantro
A local veggie, popular around Easter. Well, not actually a veggie, but a flower from a palm tree. These are boiled first, then coverd in an omelette-like egg batter, and served with tomato, chili and onion sauce. Supposedly crisp and taste like sweet babycorn.  Will try some out before they go out of season.
A pound of tomatoes will set you back about $0.50 cents at most, sometimes $0.25. Onions are sligthly cheaper.
Chickens are kept in the back and sold freshly killed that morning. I looked for pink slime and/or meat slurry. Couldn't find any.
A very popular fruit here. With the consistency of a ripe plum, but sweeter. You eat with the skin. Big seed in the middle. A bag with about 25 will set you back 5Q.
Apples are really expensive right now. Right around 5 for 10Q, although you can find deals of 7 for 10Q.
Very popular fruit in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Tastes like strawberry, pineapple and coconut. Supposedly, helpful in reducing the risk of breast cancer.
Not a super popular item here, compared to Mexico. Food is not prepared really spicy.
The star-shaped fruit (aka starfruit, carambola) to the left is grown in tropical regions. Comes from Asia and a websearch reveals they came to Florida about 100 years ago. Swee-sour taste and popular with children.
Fish and meats are the only things I'm hesitant to buy here, unless the meat looks really fresh. The little blocks of ice don't convince me that the food will stay fresh for long. Wash, wash, wash when we get home is the drill.
Codfish
Meat runs about 20Q a pound for pork chops. Thick steaks are not commonly sold here. the meat is sliced much thinner than in the US. I'm sure any butcher will give you whatever cut if you ask.
Catfish and Shrimp
Polleria (Chicken Store)
At under 50Q, a good choice. Coffee included. The home version is much cheaper though :)
Picadilly Restaurant
Shopping at Local Food Market
HoneyBadger
Author: HoneyBadger (ID: 19648)
Posted: 2012-04-11 01:24 GMT+00:00
Mileage: 2.18 km
(1 rating)
Tags: Travel, Good Food, Grand Tour, People
Views: 2881
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Entrance to Crafts Market
This is sort of a tourist trap because of its location, right across the Main Square. While most items are less than $5 a piece, here is where you can find that beautiful, huge painting for $800-$900 bucks. Which is gringo price. Here, EVERYTHING is on sale, and rarely is the sticker price the actual price. And if you're a tourist, you'll get the sky high price, which is not the real price but a "I'd like to go on vacation for the weekend, here's what you need to pay so I can make it happen." Don't be afraid to bargain everywhere, except restaurants. Doesn't work there, trust me. Although draw, the line at the little Mayan girl asking 1Q ($0.15) for a piece of candy on the street. Don't be a Scrooge and ask for your change back on a 5Q bill.
Inside Crafts Market
Lots of stuff at cheap prices... If you know how to bargain. I'm used to asking "Y el precio de oferta?" (What's the sale price), right after they tell me the initial price, since they'll come down right away. Then you can start bargaining from there. And you can really practice here, since you can walk away and just start bargaining for the same item, at the stall next door.
San Jose El Viejo Ruins
Colonial Strip Mall
Entrance to Local Food Market
The rule, when travelling overseas, is "Eat local, save a bundle." Lots of fresh veggies, fruits, and other items at ridiculously cheap prices.
In Season? They Got It
Almost any fruit/vegetable, if in season, can be found here.
Beans and Corn
There are three varieties of red beans alone, as well as assorted types of corn. Cheap prices, about $1 a pound for beans.
Tamarind!
Hadn't seen tamarind in a long time. Popular in the islands.
Fresh Stuff
Trucks come in, unload at the back, where it moves a few feet to the stalls. Market is only open three days a week and it's VERY clean. There isn't a rotten food smell to be found anywhere. Police patrol constantly and it's not uncommon to see tourists walking around with big, expensive cameras, snapping away. I don't let my guard down, but it's very safe,
Fresh Cilantro
Pacaya
A local veggie, popular around Easter. Well, not actually a veggie, but a flower from a palm tree. These are boiled first, then coverd in an omelette-like egg batter, and served with tomato, chili and onion sauce. Supposedly crisp and taste like sweet babycorn. Will try some out before they go out of season.
More Veggies
A pound of tomatoes will set you back about $0.50 cents at most, sometimes $0.25. Onions are sligthly cheaper.
Chicken and Tortilla Stand
Chickens are kept in the back and sold freshly killed that morning. I looked for pink slime and/or meat slurry. Couldn't find any.
Jocotes
A very popular fruit here. With the consistency of a ripe plum, but sweeter. You eat with the skin. Big seed in the middle. A bag with about 25 will set you back 5Q.
Apples and Bananas
Apples are really expensive right now. Right around 5 for 10Q, although you can find deals of 7 for 10Q.
Soursop (Guanabana)
Very popular fruit in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Tastes like strawberry, pineapple and coconut. Supposedly, helpful in reducing the risk of breast cancer.
Chili Peppers
Not a super popular item here, compared to Mexico. Food is not prepared really spicy.
Carambolas and Carrots
The star-shaped fruit (aka starfruit, carambola) to the left is grown in tropical regions. Comes from Asia and a websearch reveals they came to Florida about 100 years ago. Swee-sour taste and popular with children.
Fish Market
Fish and meats are the only things I'm hesitant to buy here, unless the meat looks really fresh. The little blocks of ice don't convince me that the food will stay fresh for long. Wash, wash, wash when we get home is the drill.
Codfish
Fresh Meat
Meat runs about 20Q a pound for pork chops. Thick steaks are not commonly sold here. the meat is sliced much thinner than in the US. I'm sure any butcher will give you whatever cut if you ask.
Catfish and Shrimp
Polleria (Chicken Store)
Guatemalan Breakfast
At under 50Q, a good choice. Coffee included. The home version is much cheaper though :)
Picadilly Restaurant
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